Emotional Support Pet or Service Animal?

​Good luck to the Woodstock Elementary Robotics team this morning as they face off in the first round of competition.

All year, the 4th grade robotics team has been researching the differences between emotional support animals, service animals, and therapy animals, and compiling data for today’s presentation. 


Here’s a quick run-down on support animals:

An emotional support animal can help soothe individuals with conditions like Axiety, Depression, Autism, or uncomfortable health disorders. Some Emotional Support pets have formal training, while most others become emotional support pets naturally. They don’t need formal training, to be registered, or to wear a special vest- a common misconception.

Therapy Animals are trained animals which are taken to nursing homes to uplift the patients, cancer centers, or used in therapy to aid in a patient’s progress. 

Service Animals are a special class of animal which have specialized training to aid an individual with necessities like dressing, shopping, tasks in the home, or getting around in general. Service animals can be trained, for example, to alert an individual with epilepsy before an episode so they can take medication or get to safety to avoid being hurt. A Service Animal typically wears a vest while “working” and must stay extremely focused, which is why one should never pet a service dog. 

Your pet can become your emotional support animal, especially if you have a distressing physical or mental health condition your pet has become attuned to, and helps you to cope with. Your pet won’t become a “service animal” however, unless it recieves appropriate training and testing. 

I hope that made sense, because there is actually quite a bit of controversy surrounding the differences, vests, registries, and animal safety. 


After the robotics team learned about the different types of support animals, they decided to study the effects Emotional Support animals can have on people with chronic illness. I was lucky enough to be one of their test subjects by spending time with a fun-loving rabbit named Maz.  

After three times bunnysitting, I can say that having a furbaby to talk to, cuddle with, and laugh at does wonders for my mood and movement. 

I can’t take care of any pet completely alone, and even the rabbit could be too noisy and messy at times, so the whole family shared in the responsibility. 

Since losing my precious dog this past year, life has not been the same. Each moment I spend with “Maz the rabbit” seems to bandage my heart that much more.

The robotics team has been recording this data, collecting online research, and even visited a rabbit adoption center together to learn more about emotional support rabbits. 

“Maz” is a full time emotional support rabbit to a young man with Autism who has been kind enough to lend his own fur-baby to the study. Maz is an adventurous and curious little bunny, but when she is finished hopping around, she’ll beg to be pet for hours. 

I’m hoping our robotics team hops over all of the competition today. Rooting for Team W.E.S. Bunnybots!!!

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About abodyofhope

I do not know why it is that we must wade through tragic circumstances to find truth. We nearly drown! But under the water, there are pearls. I hope in writing this blog, more will come to the surface. Over the past 11 years living with chronic pain, patient advocacy has affected my life through so many remarkable young people, women and men: SURVIVORS. These individuals are HOPE personified. I wish to honor them in the same spirit they have encouraged me to press on. Four years ago, I became bed-bound from a variety of chronic illnesses after a procedure meant to help the pain condition I had been managing for several years- went bust #BIGTIME. In the last 4 years, my entire life has changed. I have changed, but I am still striving to live my best life possible. Along with sharing inspiring pieces, medical/holistic research, and awareness articles, this blog is also an attempt to put my own pieces back together. Welcome to A Body of Hope, and thank you for visiting. [Complex Regional Pain Syndrome/ RSD, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), Dysautonomia, Chronic Intractable Migraine, Cluster headache, Trigeminal Neuralgia, Occipital Neuralgia, Hypersensitivity to Sound & Light, Fibromyalgia, Cerebrospinal Fluid Imbalance......blah, blah, blah] >>> P.S. My headgear is protective for pain. I just rock it hard.

Posted on December 10, 2016, in Health, Medical Research/ Treatments and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. I’m glad Maz has given you some furry comfort. I know how important that is. This is a great study! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Kathleen! My first week bunnysitting, Maz was sort of jumpy (no pun), and since I’ve wanted a rabbit for so long I was disappointed she wasn’t more cuddly. She has calmed down here since, but I’ve realized how important it is to find the RIGHT animal for you- not just species, but all around personality. Thanks to Maz and this study, I’ll know not to pick a random rabbit 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  2. What an interesting study! I must say, I too had wondered about the differences between the categories. I’m so glad you received emotional support from Maz.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, the service animal people kindly schooled me on the differences, lol. Apparently, untrained animals wearing vests which misbehave in public can cause problems for trained service dogs and the disabled owners they are trying to help. There are also false registries which one can pay to be certified with, but have no value whatsoever. All one needs is to say is their dog is a service dog, although they will also have proof of (very expensive) training and a doctor’s note. A facility must permit them to keep their dog with them.
      Probably TMI, but just in case you’re interested 🙂
      Thank you so much for reading!

      Like

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